E6B FLIGHT COMPUTER TUTORIAL PDF

The B and C scale must be good friends. This side has three scales that you can line up to calculate things. The A scale the outermost circle , the B scale the middle circle , and C scale the inner circle. The general concept to learn is that for most problems to solve, there are three elements: you line up a number on the outer scale A with a number on the inner scale B or C , and then know where to look for your answer. You have to reason if that means 11, , or

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The amount of fuel available, not including reserve fuel, is the determining factor. Fuel available, not including reserve, is 4 hr.

What is your radius of action? Rotate the inner scale so that the total time of 4 hr. Without rotating the disk, locate the groundspeed for the inbound leg of kt. Look directly under to determine a time of min.

You may fly outbound for this amount of time before you must turn to return to the departure point. Without rotating the disk, locate the outbound groundspeed of kt. The outbound time of min. This is equal to the 4 hr. Place the Index opposite the outbound groundspeed of kt. Locate min. The radius of action is NM. To convert U. Locate 35 imperial gallons on the outer scale. Opposite 35 is 42 on the inner scale.

Converting Fuel and Oil Weight Aviation gas fuel weighs 6 lb. At " Locate 35 on the inner scale and directly above read on the outer scale. Locate 2 on the inner scale and directly above read 15 on the outer scale. Converting Feet to Meters, Pounds to Kilograms, and Gallons to Liters A similar process, as previously discussed, can be used to convert feet to meters, pounds to kilograms, gallons to liters, or vice versa. Set the appropriately labeled arrows opposite each other on the outer and inner scales.

Read the values on the scale containing the arrow for the corresponding unit of measure. Locate 2, on the outer scale and directly below read on the inner scale. Converting Minutes to Seconds To convert minutes to seconds, place the Index opposite the number of minutes on the outer scale.

Directly above the arrow on the outer scale is the number of seconds. Rotate the inner scale so that the Index is directly under 1. Due to the widely varying performance characteristics of various aircraft, the FAA states the required climb performance in feet to be gained per nautical mile covered on the ground.

Since the vertical speed indicator VSI in your airplane is calibrated in feet per minute, you must be able to convert to determine whether your airplane can meet the minimum climb performance.

At some airports with noise abatement procedures, the minimum climb rate may be expressed as feet per nautical mile. To convert, set the Index opposite the groundspeed on the outer scale. The inner scale will represent the climb rate expressed as feet per nautical mile. The outer scale will represent the climb rate expressed in feet per minute.

Rotate the inner scale so that the Index is directly under the groundspeed of 90 on the outer scale. Locate on the inner scale and directly above is on the outer scale. A climb rate of feet per nautical mile with a kt. INDEX" appears in the right window. Align the arrow with the known outside air temperature. On the inner scale, locate the Mach number. Directly above the Mach number, read the true airspeed on the outer scale. Locate Mach 0. Directly above 0. The top scale is degrees Celsius and the bottom scale is degrees Fahrenheit.

The wind side consists of a rotating plotting transparency attached to a frame and a sliding card. A compass rose is printed on the outside of the plotting transparency. The transparency allows you to mark on it with a pencil and to see the grid on the sliding card. A small metal rivet called a grommet is located at the center of the plotting transparency. At the top of the frame is a large triangle in the center called the True Index. A correction scale is shown in degrees left and right of the True Index.

This scale can be used when applying the wind correction angle WCA. NOTE: The instructions regarding how to use the wind side of the Gleim flight computer found below and at the top of the sliding card on the computer itself require you to set magnetic values i.

We have retained the name "True Index" vs. Do not be concerned about this minor semantic inconsistency. We promote the use of magnetic wind directions and course values because many courses are flown directly to or from VORs. VOR compass roses are oriented to magnetic north; thus, it is possible to obtain the magnetic course to or from a VOR directly from the chart without using a plotter.

The grid on the sliding card is a section of a large circle. The vertical converging lines, called wind correction lines, represent degrees left or right of the center line. The wind correction lines are spaced at 2 intervals between the horizontal arcs labeled "30" to "," and at 1 intervals above the "" arc.

The horizontal arcs, called speed arcs, are concentric circles around the center of the circle and represent a distance from the center. These arcs are used for speed and are spaced two units usually knots or miles per hour apart.

At the top of the sliding card are directions on how to use the wind side of the flight computer to determine groundspeed and wind correction angle WCA.

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E6B Flight Computer

The amount of fuel available, not including reserve fuel, is the determining factor. Fuel available, not including reserve, is 4 hr. What is your radius of action? Rotate the inner scale so that the total time of 4 hr. Without rotating the disk, locate the groundspeed for the inbound leg of kt.

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The E6B has mostly been replaced with on board electronic flight computers, but is still used for flight training or as a backup. With the E6B, a pilot can do many flight planning calculations. These include: wind correction, fuel burn, time and distance, and ground speed. Philip Dalton and became very popular for military and airline use. How to use the E6B Flight Computer The E6B has two primary part: the circular slide rule and the wind side The back of the flight computer with the wind side allow calculations for wind correction angle and ground speed With the E6B you can do many conversions too. These include nautical to statute miles, miles to kilometers, US gallons to Imperial Gallons, Quantity to Weight conversions.

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