MACROSIPHUM ROSAE PDF

Geographical distribution: Cosmopolitan, occurring wherever roses are found. Host plants: Roses Rosa spp. Morphology: The body of apterous females is green-brown; the legs and the long siphunculi are brown-black and the long cauda is pale. The alate females are similar to the apterae, except that the head and thorax are dark. The body of both female forms is mm long and their antennae are longer than the bodies.

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Bob, Influentialpoints: Nice piccies! The aphid is Macrosiphum rosae rose aphid on its secondary host various Valerianaceae and Dipsacaceae including Succisa. There is another quite rare aphid found on Succisa which you should watch out for called Macrosiphum weberi. Aphids are dark red or violet with black siphunculiu.

It lives in small ant attended colonies on stems of Succisa pratensis. Beware - Macrosiphum rosae also has a red form. They turned out to be not Macrosiphum rosae but a green form of Macrosiphum weberi! Moral of the story? Whilst one can identify many aphid species from photos, unusual colour forms can easily mislead.

Checking under the microscope is always a good idea. Many thanks for your message, and for providing the ID for those aphids. I was out at Dundreggan again yesterday and spent some more time with the same patch of devlisbit scabious. There were also quite a few of the orange midge larvae, so I took more photos of those, and am attaching some for your interest.

Do you have any idea what species they might be? If so, why do the aphids get caught like that? Bob, Influentialpoints: Thanks for your emails re midge cecidomyiid larvae, once again the photos are superb. Pardon me if I answer your questions more or less in reverse order. Re cecidomyiid larvae, yes they suck the juice out of the aphids. They can move surprisingly fast, wriggling along in humping, or vaguely snake-like fashion. There is some info on available on the web but the most useful reference is not available unless you want to pay for it.

It is : Harris, K. Aphidophagous Cecidomyiidae Diptera : taxonomy, biology and assessments of field populations. Bulletin of Entomological Research This is the abstract: Larvae of Aphidoletes Kieffer and Monobremia Kieffer feed exclusively as predators on aphids.

The taxonomic status of these genera and their included species is reviewed and new generic and specific synonymies are given. Diagnostic characters of these species are indicated and characters of the male genitalia, female wings and larval skins are illustrated. Published information on their biology, particularly of the commonest species A. Lestodiplosis grassator Fyles , L. Counts of aphids, Aphidoletes, Syrphids, Coccinellids and Anthocorids in 35 samples taken from aphid colonies occurring at Wisley in are tabulated, together with seven samples from other localities.

Aphidoletes mainly A. That said, the most up to date taxonomic account is available to download free of charge - namely: Raymond J. Feeds on Adelges abietis;A. Feeds on Aphis sp. Adelges piceae Hemiptera: Adelgidae. This species was reportedly introduced into Canada in the s and from there into the USA Dowden , but could have been confused in Europe and in North America with the widespread A.

Aphidoletes thompsoni and A. Harris in litt. Feeds on Adelges Aphidoletes urticaria. Feeds on Aphis urticata and many genera of aphids Hemiptera: Aphididae , Monobremia lobata.

India Uttar Pradesh. Monobremia longicornis. Russia Far East. Monobremia rishikeshensis. Monobremia subterranea. Feeds on Metanipponaphis vandergrooti; Aphis spp. Other possibilities are Aphidoletes urticaria and Monobremia subterranea. If you can rear some through to adult, it would probably be easy enough to get a definite ID. From looking at the details and doing some web searching, I suspect that the midge larvae may be Aphidoletes aphidimyza - images of that species at evergreengrowers.

Using a key for rose-aphids, linked on Your website, I tried to identify them on my own. Is it Wahlgreniella ossiannilssoni? Image copyright V. Wagner, all rights reserved. Bob, Influentialpoints: Nice picture - but that aphid is not alive.

It is a parasitized mummy. It is often impossible to identify the aphid species from the mummy, but the long slightly curving siphunculi strongly suggest it was Macrosiphum rosae.

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H21 OPTICON PDF

Macrosiphum

Their eyes are reddish and the antennae are dusky. The antennal terminal process is 4. The apical parts of the femora are black cf. Macrosiphum euphorbiae which has the apical parts of the femora pale or only slightly dusky. The siphunculi are pale with the tips darker. The cauda is rather pointed and not constricted.

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Genus Macrosiphum

Bob, Influentialpoints: Nice piccies! The aphid is Macrosiphum rosae rose aphid on its secondary host various Valerianaceae and Dipsacaceae including Succisa. There is another quite rare aphid found on Succisa which you should watch out for called Macrosiphum weberi. Aphids are dark red or violet with black siphunculiu. It lives in small ant attended colonies on stems of Succisa pratensis. Beware - Macrosiphum rosae also has a red form. They turned out to be not Macrosiphum rosae but a green form of Macrosiphum weberi!

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