PARCHEESI RULES PDF

Rules to Play Parcheesi Board Game The detailed analysis of each stage and different rules are given below. Start of the Game: The game begins when each player chooses their color. Any player can then start rolling the dice first and then the turns are rotated in either clockwise or anti-clockwise direction. The final call in deciding the turns goes to the players playing the game.

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Moving your Entered Pawns Move your entered pawns counterclockwise along the path the number of spaces you roll on the dice; see the arrow on the gameboard diagram. Move your pawns by the rules below: You may move one or two pawns on your turn. You must move whenever possible.

If you cannot move by the count of both dice, you may move one pawn by the count of either one of the dice. No more than two of your pawns can occupy any space. Doublets A roll of matching dice is called doublets. A roll of doublets entitles you to another roll - and may also entitle you to a bonus move. If you roll doublets before all of your pawns are entered, take your turn as usual, then roll again.

Doublets Bonus If you roll doublets after all four of your pawns are entered, use the four numbers on the tops and the bottoms of the dice for movement. The total of this four-part move is always 14, and can be taken by one pawn or split among 2 or more pawns. If you decide to split the move among three pawns, you may decide to move one pawn 6 spaces, a second pawn 1 space, and the third pawn 6 spaces, then 1 space. Whether you move or not, roll again.

This ends your turn. Pawns cannot be captured on their Home Path spaces, or on most Safety spaces; see Safety Spaces, right, for the exception. If you capture a pawn after moving on the count of one die, you may continue your move with the same pawn or with another pawn. Capture Bonus: After capturing a pawn, move any one of your pawns an additional 20 spaces at the end of your turn. If you capture during a Doublets Bonus move, complete your capture bonus before moving again.

Two pawns of different colors can never share a Safety space. Pawns cannot be captured on Safety spaces. Blockades Two pawns of the same color on any path space form a blockade.

A blockade cannot be landed on, passed or captured by any pawn. The two pawns in a blockade cannot be moved forward to form a blockade together on a new space. Each pawn must enter home by exact die roll, counting the HOME square as a space.

Home Bonus After moving a pawn into home, move any one of your pawns an additional 10 spaces at the end of your turn. End of the Game.

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Parcheesi rules

History of ludo Parcheesi is a board game for 2, 3 or 4 players based on ludo that can be played individually or with teams. Each player has 4 pieces of the same color green, yellow, blue or red that start on a special square called home. The board is made of 68 common squares where the pieces move. There are 32 not common squares, 8 for each player, 7 of them called target passage and being the eighth the target. The goal of the game is to take your 4 pieces to the target square. How to play parcheesi At the start of the match, each player rolls a dice. The one who gets the biggest value, starts the match.

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Parcheesi Rules: How Do You Play Parcheesi?

Moving your Entered Pawns Move your entered pawns counterclockwise along the path the number of spaces you roll on the dice; see the arrow on the gameboard diagram. Move your pawns by the rules below: You may move one or two pawns on your turn. You must move whenever possible. If you cannot move by the count of both dice, you may move one pawn by the count of either one of the dice. No more than two of your pawns can occupy any space. Doublets A roll of matching dice is called doublets.

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